BOICUT

BOICUT

The Austrian born artist lives and works in Vienna. BOICUT‘s work is very illustrative, combining impulsive lines and shapes.
To this date his work was shown in Berlin, London, Luxembourg, Miami, Munich and his home base Vienna. In addition, he has worked with brands such as Nitro Snowboards, Absolut, Jameson, Remington, Vans, Paul Frank, Levis, KangaRoos, Hennessy, Samsung, Converse. Since 2014 the artist is represented by Galerie Ernst Hilger / Hilger NEXT.

www.boicut.com

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BOICUT

Q & A

Your recent work is especially inspired by the forms and shapes of everyday objects. Do you find them randomly, or do you go on a hunt for ideas?

Boicut: I have always been drawn to mundane objects. My approach varies from taking pictures of random shapes to actually hunting them down while working on a specific project. This summer, which I spent at @void_project’s artist residency in Spain, I let my inner child guide me through the huge building I was staying in, and through the abandoned factory next door. I found tons of interesting shapes to build an archive. I used them to make digital sketches, combining several shapes at a time. Finally I took the ones I liked best and painted them on paper for the exhibition.

Talking about inspiration – you are traveling a lot, but Vienna has been your home base since the beginning of your career. Would you say this city is an inspiring place for artists?

Boicut: I definitely think Vienna is a good base. The community is great and I feel there is a lot going on – especially during summer. The quality of life is also pretty good. I am sharing a beautiful studio with my girlfriend Z, who is also an artist. The place has huge ceilings and even a second floor, and it is located in a very central neighborhood. I don’t think we would be able to afford such a place in any other bigger city. But I am always happy to go on trips to find inspiration. Sometimes I feel Vienna is too clean. It is much easier for me to find beautiful shapes in run down places.

Your pieces are very abstract, and it seems that you have a very playful workflow. How do you actually create your compositions? How much randomness is involved? Or do you sketch before and plan out exactly?

Boicut: I do not have a specific workflow as I would get bored of repeating the same steps over and over. I think I have found a visual language that I am comfortable speaking, but at the same time I love to experiment with its various dialects. The way I approach a new artwork often depends on my mood. Sometimes I do make very specific digital sketches for a canvas. When it comes to the actual painting part, it is more like a painting by numbers process then. I would put on some nice tunes and sit for hours just focusing on the way I apply the already predefined colors onto the canvas. This can be very meditating. Sometimes I would just have a very rough sketch done with a pen in my sketchbook, and directly start the canvas from there. Not having a specific workflow has its pros and cons. I often feel like being on thin ice while working on something new. But this process is very important to me. The more I struggle, the greater the relief feels afterwards.

You work both digitally as well as on canvas and murals. Which is your favorite medium?

Boicut: It totally depends on the project I am working on. As much as I like the physical and sometimes messy process of working with paint and cans, I really appreciate the possibilities we nowadays have when it comes to digital painting. Technology made a huge step within the last decade, and I have been using my drawing tablets for ages now. I like to play and blur the edges between digital and analogue. Besides working on my own projects, I also enjoy taking part in collaborations. For example with NASCH sportswear, who recently released their jackets with my design. In this case of course it made much more sense to work digitally, to be able to play with different color combinations easily. The prints available at Atelier Olschinsky Artstore where also created digitally, but still have an analogue touch because of the technique I used. On the other hand I also love to incorporate typical digital brush strokes in my analogue work.

You also recently started stick and poke tattoo as an artistic project. Tell us something about it.

Boicut: I’ve been fascinated by tattoos from my early twenties on, when I went to lots of hardcore and punk rock shows and everyone was covered in ink. I had actually considered becoming a tattoo artist in case my application to university where I studied graphic design wouldn´t have been successful. For all the time, from when I was a student, then worked in an advertising agency, and then became a self employed artist, learning how to tattoo has always been on my bucket list. Fortunately, I met tattoo artist @_hahafuck earlier this year. I was amazed by the technique of hand poking where lots of dots turn into solid lines. He was kind enough to show me everything I need and even let me do my first tattoo on his thigh. I remember how much fun it was and how good it felt. That’s when I knew that I have found another passion. I am lucky to have so many amazing friends who trusted me, so I could practice in the following months. Personally I consider tattooing as some kind of performance, where people give me parts of their skin to use as a canvas. Hand poking feels like meditation to me, due to the long time it takes to do even a few simple lines. I would sit and solely focus on one dot at the time. I recently opened a new IG account @oughtlow which is only for my tattoos. Feel free to check it out!

What’s next on your agenda?
Boicut: I have a few very exciting projects coming up. First, there is a project for which I will portrait people –  and if you are familiar with my work, you know it will be a fun challenge. I am curious to see how they will turn out.
In December I will focus on painting a bunch of new canvases, and I will also start experimenting with frame by frame animation, which I something I can do on my couch when it gets too cold in the studio.
At the beginning of 2019 I will escape the winter and fly to India to paint a huge mural at St+art Festival in Delhi. Another thing I am looking forward to is a residency in France combined with a solo show later that year.
In between I want to do more tattoos and visit my good friend and fellow artist @peterphobia who moved to New York last summer.

 

WORK BY THE ARTIST

BLOW UP SOME DUST

BOICUT

FINE ART PRINTS
Available in cm
40x50 / 50x70 / 70x100

GRAMPS KISSING

BOICUT

FINE ART PRINTS
Available in cm
40x50 / 50x70 / 70x100

PINA COLADA

BOICUT

FINE ART PRINTS
Available in cm
40x50 / 50x70 / 70x100

VULCUMMO

BOICUT

MISCELLANEOUS
PIN
29 mm

TITFACE

BOICUT

MISCELLANEOUS
PIN
29 mm

PIMMELPALME

BOICUT

MISCELLANEOUS
PIN
29 mm

MUMUMUSCHEL

BOICUT

MISCELLANEOUS
PIN
29 mm

BOICUT PIN SET (NSFW)

BOICUT

MISCELLANEOUS
PIN SET
29 mm / 4 pcs

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